Wheelchair Accessibility_1

The Facts

About 36 million women in the U.S. have disabilities and the number is growing. (1)


Nearly a third of women with physical disabilities reported being denied services at a doctor's office solely because of their disability. (2)


People with disabilities are 2.5 times more likely to have unmet health care needs than non–disabled peers. (3)


Women who have major difficulties in walking are 40% less likely to be screened for cervical cancer compared with other women. (4)


Women who have major difficulties in walking are 30% less likely to have a mammogram for breast cancer screening compared with other women. (4)

Repeated studies demonstrate much lower rates of screening mammography and Pap tests among women with disabilities than among those without. (5)

Barriers to healthcare have a disproportionately negative effect on the health and longevity of women with disabilities compared to non-disabled women. (5)

Women with disabilities are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease compared to women with no disabilities. (6)

The ADA has had a limited impact on how healthcare is delivered for people with disabilities. (7)

Significant architectural and programmatic accessibility barriers are present in healthcare. (7) 

    

A substantial proportion of primary care physicians’ offices are still not in compliance with ADA requirements. (5)

Many women with disabilities find the attitudes of healthcare providers a barrier to healthcare.  (7)

Healthcare providers continue to lack awareness about steps they are required to take to ensure that patients with disabilities have access to appropriate, culturally competent care, and about incentives for implementing such steps. (7)

In general, doctors are reported to lack sensitivity and understanding of disability and make erroneous assumptions based on disability. (7)

 

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Division of Human Development and Disability. Disability and Health Data System (DHDS) Data [online]. [Accessed August 6, 2019].

  2. https://www.bcm.edu/research/labs-and-centers/research-centers/center-for-research-on-women-with-disabilities/a-to-z-directory/health-care

  3. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/003335491012500107

  4. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(11)61825-4/fulltext

  5. Altman B , Bernstein A . Disability and health in the United States, 2001–2005. Hyattsville (MD) : National Center for Health Statistics ; 2008 . Google Scholar

  6. Source: Herrick H, Luken K, Dickens P. Women with Disabilities and Heart Disease. North Carolina BRFSS Surveillance Update, No. 5. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: DHHS, Chronic Disease and Injury Section, State Center for Health Statistics. North Carolina Office on Disability and Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill;2011.

  7. https://ncd.gov/publications/2009/Sept302009#exesum